History Fest Recap

I’m finally suitably recovered from History Fest, which took place this year October 6-10.  It was even more fun and amazing than usual, and that’s saying a lot.

This was the 20th anniversary of History Fest, which is amazing in itself.

Keep in mind that this is an annual event that was created just because a wonderful local man (Jack McGowan) went to the Renaissance Festival and said that the Mankato area kids ought to have something like that to learn history in a fun way — and then made it happen (with the help of a whole lot of other people).

For twenty years now.  For no profit.

(Admission is only $5 to help cover the costs. Teachers, chaperones, children under 5 and volunteers get in free.)

And it also has become one of the most magical, educational, fantastic things I have ever experienced.

Jack McGowan didn’t just get some people together to reenact some historic events.  He used his own land and an adjacent sheep farm that was later donated to the cause, and built a historic playland.

There’s a saloon, a jail, a lodge, a troll tunnel that goes underground and comes up at a grate far away, a massive sandbox stocked with treasure to dig for, a house front rigged with a gas line to stay on fire with a fire hose attached to a working pump going into the river, stilts, carts, an enormous trebuchet that takes teams of kids to wind to launch pumpkins into the river….  And so much more.

All built by Jack and volunteers over the years for the love of the kids and “playfully preserving history.”

That’s Jack in one of the whimsical creations he’s constructed.  🙂

(photo by Jennifer McLaughlin Ware)

(photo by Jennifer McLaughlin Ware)

There are just no words for how incredible it is to take part in History Fest, and how proud I am of all of the people who come together to do this incredible thing.

This year, I took part as Lucrezia Borgia (Lucrecia for the Americans).  Our friend Dané , a local homeschool graduate whose mom helps run History Fest, made my gown — in under two weeks!

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Daryl even got me a compartment ring that we filled with pop rock candy (I mean poison!) so I could drop it into drinks to fizz mysteriously for the kids.  🙂

Of course I told them that I was an innocent and it was all nasty rumors.  The little girls especially were always on my side by the end of my story, with big eyes and outrage at all of the things my father the pope and my awful brother Cesare had done to me (and to my poor husband #2).  I told them that historians now say that Lucrezia was probably just a loyal victim of her family’s, and not involved at all in their corruption or killings.

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(photo by Jennifer McLaughlin Ware)

I didn’t mention her fondness for extramarital affairs or the illegitimate child born while she was “resting” in a convent at seventeen (in between arranged marriages #1 and #2), though.  I did tell them that her third husband greatly mourned her when she died, and the people of her land did, too.  I told them that she was a patron of the arts and loved poetry, and had eight children, and died at age 39 after having her last (stillborn) child.

Perhaps sometime they’ll hear the name Lucrecia Borgia and offer up a bit of “inside information” from when they chatted with that infamous lady one October at McGowan’s farm.  🙂

As for the rest of the family…

Daryl once again played the gambler in the saloon.

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Jack manned the Huck Finn raft and taught old fashioned games like rolling hoops and playing graces.

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He also helped out in the saloon.  He runs a mean chuck-a-luck game.

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Victoria was Joan of Arc but mostly helped out behind the scenes feeding the hordes of volunteers and reenactors.

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On the last day, she donned a gown we picked up at a thrift store for $3.

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Alex allegedly helped out at the Huck Finn raft, but mostly he just ran wild and played.  It’s hard not to run wild and play at History Fest.

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Rhia played the part of a fairy, doling out dragon tears and treasures to children (and hung out with her boyfriend, who was helping to park cars in the mornings).

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(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

And Miss Fiona played one of my daughters, Leonora d’Este (who became a nun), and also turned four years old on the last day.  Four!

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It should be noted that Fiona is a History Fest baby.  Her birthday always takes place during or right around History Fest.  I actually scheduled her C-section for that date so our family (minus myself) could still volunteer at History Fest that year.  🙂

Here are a more pics of the magic.

(photo by Jennifer McLaughlin Ware)

(photo by Jennifer McLaughlin Ware)

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(photo by Jennifer McLaughlin Ware)

(photo by Jennifer McLaughlin Ware)

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(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

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(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

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(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

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(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

(photo by Jennifer McLaughlin Ware)

(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

(photo by Jennifer McLaughlin Ware)

(photo by Jennifer McLaughlin Ware)

(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

(photo by Jennifer McLaughlin Ware)

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(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

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(photo by Jennifer McLaughlin Ware)

Sorry to deluge you with photos, and this is still only a fraction of the things to see and do at History Fest!

Now this is how to learn history.  🙂 

(photo by Jennifer McLaughlin Ware)

(photo by Jennifer McLaughlin Ware)

(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

(photo by Jennifer McLaughlin Ware)

(photo by Jennifer McLaughlin Ware)

(photo by Jennifer McLaughlin Ware)

(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

(photo by Mike Huerkamp)

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