Schoolhouse Rock Grammar Videos — The Parts of Speech

Schoolhouse Rock’s grammar series is  legendary, for good reason.  Here are all eight of their fabulous grammar videos to help kiddos remember their verbs, nouns, interjections and more.

 

Nouns:

 

Pronouns:

 

Verbs:

Adverbs:

 

 

Adjectives:

 

Conjunctions:

Prepositions:

Interjections:

 

Advertisements

Sewing 101

sew2

I learned to sew on my new sewing machine today!

sew3

I asked for a sewing machine for a solstice present from Daryl (we celebrate the winter solstice as a family, and then celebrate Christmas with extended family a couple of days later).

sew1

Today, I used the manual, DVD and lots of trial and error to figure out how to wind the bobbin, thread the needle (there are 6 numbered places to wind and wrap it, then a less than intuitive needle threader mechanism to push, wrap, wind and pull), adjust the tension, program the stitches, troubleshoot the many problems that came up and ultimately sew my very first item — a tiny bag I presented to Alex to use for marbles or some such.

sew7

Then, I taught a very enthusiastic Victoria how to use it.  She sewed a lovely little drawstring bag and she’s been pestering me to sew more things ever since.  The other kids are equally impatient to get to sewing.

sew5

It’s funny, I grew up with a professional mom and grandmother who taught me all things educational and professional, but there were no “traditional” women in my life growing up in the 70’s and 80’s.

As an adult I taught myself to cook, garden, can, forage and now sew.  I am so much more proud of these old fashioned skills I’ve learned than anything I learned in college (though I’m also proud of my career work as a poet and domestic violence advocate).

I was more intimidated by that sewing machine manual than by a nuclear physics book!

sew4

Now if I could just teach myself to clean better…  😉

 

 

Using Cuisenaire Rods to Find the LCM

I’ve loved Cuisenaire rods since I was in Montessori preschool in California many decades ago and my mother bought a set for me to play with at home.

When I became a homeschooler, I immediately bought a wooden set for my own kids, even though I still have most of the very battered cardboard box of Cuisenaire rods that my mother bought those many years ago.  I love them, and my kids love them.

We have played with them to play with math over the years, but I always knew there were far more ways to use them to teach math (including very advanced topics) and even languages.  I’ve seen literally hundreds of lesson plans to use them for anything you can think of.

I stumbled on this you-tube video the other day, though, and am once again inspired to start using them for more heavy-duty math teaching.

So simple, so easy!

Do you use Cuisenaire rods in your homeschool?  What’s your favorite way to use them?  Besides just play.  That’s still mine.  🙂

Ten Ways We’ve Learned and Played Lately

It’s been a while since I’ve done one of these lists so I thought I’d post quickly before catching up on my mile-long to-do list.  Here’s a bit of what we’ve been up to lately.

1.  We got a ton of snow last week and the kids had a blast building snow forts, making snow ramps for sleds and playing in it.

2.  Victoria has taken up knitting again, and she’s so good (and fast!).  She made a lovely multi-colored scarf for a lady at church, and this hat for Fiona.

fifihat

3.  Our couch was sagging and shot, so this morning Daryl and Jack took it apart.  They repaired and reinforced the insides so it’s as good as new.  It’s always been important to us that the kids get an education not just in academics but in life skills — knowing how to cook from scratch, repair household items, sew and mend clothes, preserve foods, find bargains, treat minor illnesses and so on.  I love that they’re growing up learning these skills that we had to teach ourselves much later in life, and that they have the knowledge to live well on very little since they won’t have to pay others to do jobs for them or just toss things out and buy new.  (See 10 Homesteading skills every child should learn for more on that).

4.  Victoria and Fiona keep drawing together.  I love that Victoria has passed on her love of drawing to Fiona and I love seeing their little joint drawings.  🙂

fividrawing

5.  We’re reading The Best Christmas Pageant Ever as a read-aloud, which has been a family tradition for as long as I can remember.  The kids never get tired of hearing that book.  🙂

6.  Rhia has kept busy with her photography, art, politics and her boyfriend, among other things.  She and Tyler are still going strong.  He continues to teach her things like car repair.  He fixed an old rusted manual typewriter for her that they found, and got it working as good as new.  He also fixed an old light that they found, wiring it and everything.  His mechanical skills are impressive and I love that she’s learning that from him.  She teaches him things too, and it’s nice to see how well they complement each other.

7.  I got a 75 cent calligraphy kit from a thrift store and got it out for the boys to use for handwriting practice.  They both need work on their handwriting but they say they hate to write.  With the pen out, they couldn’t wait to write.  Jack spent quite a long time writing out words and phrases, and Alex took a turn, too.  Later on, Victoria even asked if she could use it.

calligraphy

8.  We’ve been watching Drunk History with the kids.  The older kids and I get a lot out of it, and there have been so many times that I turned to Victoria and asked, “Did that really happen?” and she did a quick google and declared that yes, amazingly, that did.  It’s been a fun way of learning less-known history.  🙂  The younger kids have been watching more respectable Netflix shows like MythBusters, Odd Squad and Bill Nye, the Science Guy.

9.  We’ve been participating in Bountiful Baskets, a non-profit produce coop that delivers fresh fruits and vegetables to cities around the country every weekend.  They also have different add-ons every week, such as organic bread, granola, fruit by the case and themed boxes (such as all different kinds of citrus  or masa mix with corn husks and Mexican produce to make tamales).  Last week we got a 40 pound box of organic Fiji apples for $32.  It’s entirely volunteer-run (even the women who run it at the national level) and our family volunteers every Saturday to help out.  The little kids help clean laundry baskets (they use designated laundry baskets to portion all the food out for people to pick up and put in their own containers), smash boxes and carry things.  The older kids help people carry their boxes and baskets to their cars, and Daryl and I help check people in, load the baskets and so on.  It’s been a fun way to volunteer as a family, a great way to extend our grocery dollars (a basket full of fruits and veggies is only $15 and an organic box is only $25) and a neat way to discover some new fruits and vegetables.  Some of the produce we get in the boxes isn’t even available in our grocery stores.

bb2

10. We learned all about wassailing and it’s very pagan roots.  Daryl and Victoria tend to go down educational rabbit holes on our long car drives, and Victoria googles the topics and then reads everything she finds out to us.  Last week, that led to our learning more than we ever thought we could know about radon (which states have the worst problem, how radon led to lung disease in coal miners, which homes are at risk, what it does…).  This week, it was wassailing.  Now THAT was a wild tradition once upon a time.

There’s been all of the usual stuff, too, of course — Khan Academy, reading, worksheets, playing with friends, doing art, nature studies, games, cooking, talking, blogging, educational apps, playing Minecraft, playing with pets, fighting illnesses and so on.

And with that, I’m off to go read another chapter about those awful Herdman kids and try to get my downstairs remotely tidy looking.  Happy Wednesday!

 

Beanie Baby Biology Class

Beany Baby Science

Here’s a fun way to learn about animals in all kinds of ways.

We’ve started a collection of animal beanie babies for the younger kids and it’s turned into such a fun and educational collection.

We get them at thrift stores for about .50 each on average. They make just about every species you can think of.

We have a robin, moose, fox, beetle, rhino, loon, starfish, zebra, aardvark, dragonfly, squirrel, goldfish, seal, lobster, elephant, butterfly, gecko, snake, blue jay, flamingo, giraffe, poodle, ladybug, fox, wolf, black bear, raccoon, koala , octopus and lots more.

We keep them in a large basket in the living room and just about every day we find a new way to make an educational game out of them.

For instance, I’ve asked the little ones if they can sort by whether they live on land or water, the ones who lay eggs from the ones who give birth, by birds and bugs and mammals and so on.

Or sort by how many legs they have, whether they have scales or fur or feathers, whether they hibernate, whether they’re carnivores or omnivores or herbivores, or whether they can be found in our part of the world……

There are so many ways to use them.  I’m thinking we could even work language arts and such in (sort by syllables in their names or whether they start with vowels) and social studies (sort by continents).  You get the idea!

Fiona (four) loves to line them up and make up her own games with them too. And since they are pretty small, they don’t take up much room.

They also work for bean bag games and are fun to toss back into the basket to clean up.  🙂

All five of the kids now look at every thrift store we visit to see if there are any new ones to add to our collection.  Even I have fun looking for fun new species to add!

 

Toilet Paper Roll Crafts!

I’m loving this Pinterest board of nothing but toilet paper roll crafts.  With a family as big as ours, we can accumulate a lot of those tubes pretty quickly, and I’ve started to stockpile them so we can have fun making some of these.  🙂

Fun toilet paper roll crafts

I’ve started my own board of recycled crafts with my favorite of these and other craft projects that use things otherwise destined for the trash or recycling bin.

Because of all of the things that I need to catch up on, spending more time on Pinterest is at the top of the list?  🙂  Ah well!  It’s fun with the kids!