The Month of Winds and Magic

fiona butterfly

Daryl told me years ago that he read in a novel that September was “the month of winds and magic.”  That has always stuck with me and while I kind of hate September for signalling the end of summer, I kind of love September for a hundred other reasons.

(Of course, this year September has really been the month of winds, with the hurricanes and tornadoes.  Tornadoes even hit our area of Minnesota last night.  My heart goes out to everybody affected by the storms.)

We’ve been super busy with homesteading this month, as always.  September is a month where lots of garden goodies are ready to harvest and when we forage large amounts of some of our favorite wild foods like acorns and elderberries.  It’s also when we forage less than wild foods like apples and pears that are free for the picking, literally.  We have friends and neighbors who let us pick from their trees (we keep the ground underneath clean and often bring them goodies in thanks) and there are a lot of public places where we pick, too.

The nursing home in town has a huge pear tree that bears delicious fruit that they want no business with and also has a row of elderberry shrubs that are only there for a windbreak.  Daryl has permission to go picking there and we get gallons of elderberries and bushels of pears every year.  There’s also a pear tree at a rural park that bears delicious canning pears (too firm for fresh eating but perfect for canning).  You can always tell where homesteads were years ago because even though there is no sign of a house anymore you will find apple trees, pear trees, peonies and other long-lived plants that once blessed the people who lived there.

We’ve also been busy with Daryl’s birthday and our wedding anniversary.  As I’ve talked about before, we get married in a different way every year around our anniversary and this year we had our first back yard wedding.  We made it a zany theme with lots of color and silliness.  It was simple and fun.

And in other news, Jack (15) has his first job!  He was hired by a local farm family to help with the harvest.  He was originally hired to work 4-6 hours a day during the day just until the end of harvest season in October.  Then we found out that homeschoolers under 16 are not allowed to work during public school hours even if they homeschool during other times and they’re not allowed to work more than 3 hours on a public school day, so we’ve  had to change his schedule around.  He now works 3 hours “after school” most weekdays and longer on Saturdays.

It’s hard work but he is doing a great job and he got his first paycheck yesterday.  His boss also told him yesterday that he was his best worker and that he’d decided to give him a raise!  I could not be more proud of my boy.  🙂

The weather is turning cold and I’m doing my best to embrace it and not yearn for lake days and sprinkler weather.  Snow will be coming way too soon here in Minnesota but for the most part we’re too busy to focus on that anyway.

The rest of September and October will be very hectic.  I’m giving an acorn foraging presentation at a library by the Twin Cities in early October, then we have Fiona’s birthday and the week of History Fest, which is a crazy but wonderful time.  And then there’s processing hundreds of more pints and quarts of applesauce, pears, spaghetti sauce, salsa, and so on.

Oh yeah, and this homeschooling business.

 

Crash Course Kids: Month by Month

I’ve been a long-time fan of Crash Courses for older kids, but we hadn’t used the newer version for younger kids yet, Crash Course Kids.  Fiona, Alex and I checked it out last week and we’re going to incorporate it into our video watching.Crash Course Kids Homeschool ScheduleThe series is designed for 5th grade but Fiona (starting 1st grade) easily comprehended everything so far and it still kept Alex’s attention fine (6th grade).

The series consists of 7 main playlists and 2 extras (one compilation and one blooper set).  I’m tentatively planning on using one playlist per month this year (September through May), other than the longest set (earth science) from February into April with the blooper set added in for April (April Fools).  🙂

Here’s our schedule for watching them, as we have spare minutes:

September:  Space and stars

October:  Space and the sun (weather, seasons, etc.)

November:  Engineering and Physics

December:  Physical science (matter, chemistry):

January:  Life science (biology, ecosystems)

February and April:  Earth science (weather, natural resources, climate, etc.)

April:  Outtakes and bloopers

May:  Physical science (gravity)

View full playlist (5 videos)

We’ll supplement with good books, art projects, and hands-on learning.  This won’t be the younger kids’ sole science curriculum, of course, just a fun way to add some extra stuff in.

Fiona’s First Grade Math Goals

Fiona is loosely doing first grade this year (and some second grade).  You know we don’t strictly follow any skills lists or curricula, but I like to keep track of what kids her age would be covering in school and find ways to playfully teach those concepts through hands-on activities like using Cuisenaire rods, playing games, playing with math tools, measuring and making things, and so on.

a week's worth of fun mathI found this great resource at Houghton Mifflin that provides outlines, teaching tools, free printouts and family homework assignments to correspond with the concepts their textbooks teach in each year’s math books.  Here’s the general outline for their first grade math:

I plan to play with all of these concepts in the following months, and to make up some fun worksheets to reinforce the concepts.  I don’t generally print out worksheets and instead I write out problems myself in my kids’ homeschool notebooks.  It allows them to be more personal (I’ll often write out silly word problems or have sweet or funny copywork that is tailored to them, for instance), saves ink and cost, and makes it more fun for them.

They also provide these great teaching tools for the year: