Wild Kids Magazine

I’m not sure if everyone who follows this blog knows or not, but I’ve been creating a free online printable nature magazine, Wild Kids Magazine.  The August issue is out now if you want to take a look.

It’s always free and printable (in PDF format), generally around 16 pages.  Every issue has pages for nature logs and also foraging information and specific monthly themes.  It’s ad-free and I pay for it myself.  So many folks visit the site every month that it’s been costing about $25 in fees a month for my web hosting on top of what I pay annually for the Magical Childhood site that I added it to, but I am looking at it as a charitable donation I’m doing to help make the world a little.  🙂

Also, if your kiddos would ever like to submit photos (of themselves or nature finds), artwork or (especially) articles or poems, please send them in!  I’d love to feature most content from other kids.

 

(Almost) 10 Ways We’ve Played and Learned Lately

I haven’t done one of these lists in so long, so I thought I’d try to do a quick one (like I have ever been able to in the past?!).

Here are a few ways we’ve played and learned here lately……

1. We went to Valleyfair, an amusement park in the Twin Cities, for their homeschool days.  I brought Fiona, Alex and their friend Cody.  It was a fantastic day!

2. I’ve been publishing a free printable nature magazine for kids this year, Wild Kids Magazine, and Fiona especially enjoys it.  I’ve had Alex and Jack write articles for it, too.  As soon as I print it, Fiona grabs it and sits to read through it.  It has nature journal pages where she can track the birds and animals she sees that month, color botanical coloring pages, keep track of the weather for each day of the month (coloring in a weather tree) and such.  She also loves that she often spots pictures of herself and her siblings in it.  🙂

3. It’s always been a struggle to get Jack to want to write, so we’ve compromised and I have him lead his younger siblings on D&D campaigns.  He writes out all the information, stats, maps, etc. on a giant whiteboard.  He also reluctantly keeps a private journal, just so he has a little bit of regular time writing and recording his days.

4. Fiona has been working on telling time, along with a.m. and p.m.  She has a little workbook I picked up at the dollar store that has you do things like put times in order from first to last, choose whether to use a.m. or p.m. and write in how many minutes past the hour it is and how many minutes to the next hour.

5. We went hiking with friends at a nearby park with a waterfall.  We try to go there a few times a year and it’s such a magical place.

(almost) 10 ways we learned and played lately6. We’ve spent a lot of days at the lake, especially with Rhia, Fiona and Moose.

7. Jack had a suspicious lump removed from his jaw by his parotid gland.  The doctor thought it was just a cyst but because of Toria’s parotid cancer in the same spot, we wanted to be especially cautious.  He had to be put under for the surgery but came through it well and the tests came back negative.  This wasn’t fun at all, of course, but it was educational and was a pretty big thing for Jack.

….

And as I was blogging this, Fiona came and asked me to go play in the rain with her.  I told everyone else to go play in the rain and Alex finally reluctantly went, and I realized that I never want to be the kind of mom who says I have to finish blogging instead of playing in the rain with my kids.

(No photo because I was playing, not taking pictures!)

So I left the blog and went and ran in puddles and played in the rain, and now we’re wet and I have hosed off a shrieking little girl in the shower and a grumpy 12 year old took his own shower to hose off the mud (meaning 5 minutes longer he had to wait before running outside to play with Cody) and I have to get supper on the table before they all leave for rehearsal, so you don’t get to know what 8, 9 and 10 would be.

Okay, I guess one of them would be that we played in the rain.  🙂

 

 

 

Crash Course Kids: Month by Month

I’ve been a long-time fan of Crash Courses for older kids, but we hadn’t used the newer version for younger kids yet, Crash Course Kids.  Fiona, Alex and I checked it out last week and we’re going to incorporate it into our video watching.Crash Course Kids Homeschool ScheduleThe series is designed for 5th grade but Fiona (starting 1st grade) easily comprehended everything so far and it still kept Alex’s attention fine (6th grade).

The series consists of 7 main playlists and 2 extras (one compilation and one blooper set).  I’m tentatively planning on using one playlist per month this year (September through May), other than the longest set (earth science) from February into April with the blooper set added in for April (April Fools).  🙂

Here’s our schedule for watching them, as we have spare minutes:

September:  Space and stars

October:  Space and the sun (weather, seasons, etc.)

November:  Engineering and Physics

December:  Physical science (matter, chemistry):

January:  Life science (biology, ecosystems)

February and April:  Earth science (weather, natural resources, climate, etc.)

April:  Outtakes and bloopers

May:  Physical science (gravity)

View full playlist (5 videos)

We’ll supplement with good books, art projects, and hands-on learning.  This won’t be the younger kids’ sole science curriculum, of course, just a fun way to add some extra stuff in.

Fiona’s First Grade Math Goals

Fiona is loosely doing first grade this year (and some second grade).  You know we don’t strictly follow any skills lists or curricula, but I like to keep track of what kids her age would be covering in school and find ways to playfully teach those concepts through hands-on activities like using Cuisenaire rods, playing games, playing with math tools, measuring and making things, and so on.

a week's worth of fun mathI found this great resource at Houghton Mifflin that provides outlines, teaching tools, free printouts and family homework assignments to correspond with the concepts their textbooks teach in each year’s math books.  Here’s the general outline for their first grade math:

I plan to play with all of these concepts in the following months, and to make up some fun worksheets to reinforce the concepts.  I don’t generally print out worksheets and instead I write out problems myself in my kids’ homeschool notebooks.  It allows them to be more personal (I’ll often write out silly word problems or have sweet or funny copywork that is tailored to them, for instance), saves ink and cost, and makes it more fun for them.

They also provide these great teaching tools for the year:

Homeschooling with Kindle Unlimited

If you’re a subscriber to Kindle Unlimited, you can read my books, Elderberries: The Beginner’s Guide to Foraging, Preserving and Using Elderberries for Health Remedies, Recipes, Drinks and More (with over 60 recipes for health remedies, desserts, jellies, wines, liqueurs and more), and A Magical Homeschool: Nature Studies (52 Wonderful Ways to Use Nature Studies in Every Season to Teach Science, Math, Art and More) for free!

Homeschooling with Kindle Unlimited

I’m enrolled in KDP on Amazon, which means these books are only available through Amazon and if you subscribe to Kindle Unlimited you can read them (and over a million other titles) for free.

We’ve been subscribed to KU for a few months and I’ve found a lot of great books for myself and the kids.  I started a Facebook group, Homeschooling with Kindle Unlimited to share good homeschooling books available through KU if you’re looking for new titles, too.

Homeschooling with Kindle Unlimited

I have found and shared lots of great books on the Facebook page so far, from Harry Potter to classic literature to math and science joke books to secular Charlotte Mason homeschool books to books about Vikings and parts of speech and woodworking projects…

Authors subscribed to the KDP program get paid a tiny payment per page read when their books are read through Kindle Unlimited, so if you are enrolled in KU this is a great free way to support your favorite authors too.  🙂

You can find out more about Kindle Unlimited here, and also sign up for a free 30 day trial (which is what we initially did to see if it was a good fit and then we decided to keep it).

Please leave comments about good books you know of in the program or subjects you’re interested in!

(This page contains affiliate links)

 

Printable Stroop Test!

Here’s a little fun to do with the kiddos.  The Crafty Classroom has a free printable Stroop test.  It’s harder than it looks!  🙂

She doesn’t go into the science behind it but here’s good info from Neuroscience for Kids:

The famous “Stroop Effect” is named after J. Ridley Stroop who discovered this strange phenomenon in the 1930s. Here is your job: name the colors of the following words. Do NOT read the words…rather, say the color of the words. For example, if the word “BLUE” is printed in a red color, you should say “RED”. Say the colors as fast as you can. It is not as easy as you might think!

As for what’s happening…

The words themselves have a strong influence over your ability to say the color. The interference between the different information (what the words say and the color of the words) your brain receives causes a problem. There are two theories that may explain the Stroop effect:

  1. Speed of Processing Theory: the interference occurs because words are read faster than colors are named.

  2. Selective Attention Theory: the interference occurs because naming colors requires more attention than reading words.

Great Pinterest Boards and Some Fun Freebies

I love it when I find a great Pinterest board full of neat stuff I haven’t seen before.  I’ve stopped using Pinterest the regular way since it’s so full of the same old stuff and so many screaming text pins designed to give no information at all and just get you to click on them for blog hits.

My new way of perusing Pinterest is to just pin awesome stuff I find on my own and when Pinterest says “also on this board” I click on that board to see what people who like the same sort of content that I like have found.  Then I lose an hour scrolling through all of their awesome finds.  🙂

Some great boards (from all different users) that I’ve had fun perusing have included….

I have lost far too much time happily exploring boards like these!

(If you want to see my 100 or so (yikes!) boards, I’m Magic and Mayhem on Pinterest.)

Here are some of the fun homeschool goodies I’ve discovered recently….

How to Use a Protractor Freebie

How to make a clay whistle (the link is broken but the image gives a lot of info)

Which presidents are on your money?

(“This comes from Nerdwallet.com, a free tool that helps users find low rates on credit cards, savings and checking accounts, scholarships and other things.”)

FREE Greek and Latin Root Word Activities

Hands on Venn diagrams (found somewhere here but it was pinned to the general blog and there’s no search function, so I gave up looking for the original post.)

And here are some of the things I’ve pinned from my own columns recently…

Free 76-page pioneer projects book for kids

30 Days of fun poetry assignments for all ages

Print out a fun, free U.S. states game!

Excellent free astronomy classes and lesson plans online

Use printable car maps to help kids learn their states on road trips!

And a bit of fun math/English humor…..

Are you on Pinterest?  Please leave me your Pinterest URL if you are so I can follow you, too (and lose even more of my time)!  🙂