Wild Kids Magazine

I’m not sure if everyone who follows this blog knows or not, but I’ve been creating a free online printable nature magazine, Wild Kids Magazine.  The August issue is out now if you want to take a look.

It’s always free and printable (in PDF format), generally around 16 pages.  Every issue has pages for nature logs and also foraging information and specific monthly themes.  It’s ad-free and I pay for it myself.  So many folks visit the site every month that it’s been costing about $25 in fees a month for my web hosting on top of what I pay annually for the Magical Childhood site that I added it to, but I am looking at it as a charitable donation I’m doing to help make the world a little.  🙂

Also, if your kiddos would ever like to submit photos (of themselves or nature finds), artwork or (especially) articles or poems, please send them in!  I’d love to feature most content from other kids.

 

(Almost) 10 Ways We’ve Played and Learned Lately

I haven’t done one of these lists in so long, so I thought I’d try to do a quick one (like I have ever been able to in the past?!).

Here are a few ways we’ve played and learned here lately……

1. We went to Valleyfair, an amusement park in the Twin Cities, for their homeschool days.  I brought Fiona, Alex and their friend Cody.  It was a fantastic day!

2. I’ve been publishing a free printable nature magazine for kids this year, Wild Kids Magazine, and Fiona especially enjoys it.  I’ve had Alex and Jack write articles for it, too.  As soon as I print it, Fiona grabs it and sits to read through it.  It has nature journal pages where she can track the birds and animals she sees that month, color botanical coloring pages, keep track of the weather for each day of the month (coloring in a weather tree) and such.  She also loves that she often spots pictures of herself and her siblings in it.  🙂

3. It’s always been a struggle to get Jack to want to write, so we’ve compromised and I have him lead his younger siblings on D&D campaigns.  He writes out all the information, stats, maps, etc. on a giant whiteboard.  He also reluctantly keeps a private journal, just so he has a little bit of regular time writing and recording his days.

4. Fiona has been working on telling time, along with a.m. and p.m.  She has a little workbook I picked up at the dollar store that has you do things like put times in order from first to last, choose whether to use a.m. or p.m. and write in how many minutes past the hour it is and how many minutes to the next hour.

5. We went hiking with friends at a nearby park with a waterfall.  We try to go there a few times a year and it’s such a magical place.

(almost) 10 ways we learned and played lately6. We’ve spent a lot of days at the lake, especially with Rhia, Fiona and Moose.

7. Jack had a suspicious lump removed from his jaw by his parotid gland.  The doctor thought it was just a cyst but because of Toria’s parotid cancer in the same spot, we wanted to be especially cautious.  He had to be put under for the surgery but came through it well and the tests came back negative.  This wasn’t fun at all, of course, but it was educational and was a pretty big thing for Jack.

….

And as I was blogging this, Fiona came and asked me to go play in the rain with her.  I told everyone else to go play in the rain and Alex finally reluctantly went, and I realized that I never want to be the kind of mom who says I have to finish blogging instead of playing in the rain with my kids.

(No photo because I was playing, not taking pictures!)

So I left the blog and went and ran in puddles and played in the rain, and now we’re wet and I have hosed off a shrieking little girl in the shower and a grumpy 12 year old took his own shower to hose off the mud (meaning 5 minutes longer he had to wait before running outside to play with Cody) and I have to get supper on the table before they all leave for rehearsal, so you don’t get to know what 8, 9 and 10 would be.

Okay, I guess one of them would be that we played in the rain.  🙂

 

 

 

The Month of Winds and Magic

fiona butterfly

Daryl told me years ago that he read in a novel that September was “the month of winds and magic.”  That has always stuck with me and while I kind of hate September for signalling the end of summer, I kind of love September for a hundred other reasons.

(Of course, this year September has really been the month of winds, with the hurricanes and tornadoes.  Tornadoes even hit our area of Minnesota last night.  My heart goes out to everybody affected by the storms.)

We’ve been super busy with homesteading this month, as always.  September is a month where lots of garden goodies are ready to harvest and when we forage large amounts of some of our favorite wild foods like acorns and elderberries.  It’s also when we forage less than wild foods like apples and pears that are free for the picking, literally.  We have friends and neighbors who let us pick from their trees (we keep the ground underneath clean and often bring them goodies in thanks) and there are a lot of public places where we pick, too.

The nursing home in town has a huge pear tree that bears delicious fruit that they want no business with and also has a row of elderberry shrubs that are only there for a windbreak.  Daryl has permission to go picking there and we get gallons of elderberries and bushels of pears every year.  There’s also a pear tree at a rural park that bears delicious canning pears (too firm for fresh eating but perfect for canning).  You can always tell where homesteads were years ago because even though there is no sign of a house anymore you will find apple trees, pear trees, peonies and other long-lived plants that once blessed the people who lived there.

We’ve also been busy with Daryl’s birthday and our wedding anniversary.  As I’ve talked about before, we get married in a different way every year around our anniversary and this year we had our first back yard wedding.  We made it a zany theme with lots of color and silliness.  It was simple and fun.

And in other news, Jack (15) has his first job!  He was hired by a local farm family to help with the harvest.  He was originally hired to work 4-6 hours a day during the day just until the end of harvest season in October.  Then we found out that homeschoolers under 16 are not allowed to work during public school hours even if they homeschool during other times and they’re not allowed to work more than 3 hours on a public school day, so we’ve  had to change his schedule around.  He now works 3 hours “after school” most weekdays and longer on Saturdays.

It’s hard work but he is doing a great job and he got his first paycheck yesterday.  His boss also told him yesterday that he was his best worker and that he’d decided to give him a raise!  I could not be more proud of my boy.  🙂

The weather is turning cold and I’m doing my best to embrace it and not yearn for lake days and sprinkler weather.  Snow will be coming way too soon here in Minnesota but for the most part we’re too busy to focus on that anyway.

The rest of September and October will be very hectic.  I’m giving an acorn foraging presentation at a library by the Twin Cities in early October, then we have Fiona’s birthday and the week of History Fest, which is a crazy but wonderful time.  And then there’s processing hundreds of more pints and quarts of applesauce, pears, spaghetti sauce, salsa, and so on.

Oh yeah, and this homeschooling business.

 

Five Things That Are Making Us Happy Right Now

 

scimuseum

I’m trying once again to get back to regular blogging after so many false starts, so I thought I’d just dive in with a quick post for anybody who’s still out there.

Here are 5 things making us happy right now, thanks to the convenience of Instagram.  🙂

1.  Our rescue kitten, Oscar.  Long time readers know that we’ve found homes for many feral kittens and cats over the years but we decided we were down to a manageable enough number of pets again (3 cats) that we could adopt one ourselves.

View this post on Instagram

Oscar and Fiona 💕

A post shared by Alicia Bayer (@magicandmayhem) on

2.  Silly car games on car rides.  This one that Rhia made up to occupy Fiona and Alex had us all in stitches.

3.  Easy nature studies projects.  We grew grass in CD cases a couple of weeks ago and have also been doing all kinds of other seasonal nature study activities.  (Obligatory affiliate link to my nature studies book if you want lots of other simple nature study ideas arranged by season.)

4.  Foraging as a family.  As always, we’re gathering loads of wild edible foods so far this season.  It always makes me smile to think that this all started as a fun summer homeschool project and it’s evolved into something that provides hundreds of pounds of free, healthy food for our family (and two books!).  So far this year, we’ve gathered over 60 pounds of wild asparagus and various quantities of morel mushrooms, lambsquarters, pheasant back mushrooms, nettles, ramps, violets, wild onions, and more.

5.  Membership to the science museum.  We’ve been getting lots of use out of our annual membership, even though it’s an hour and a half away in Sioux Falls.  We do much of our shopping in Sioux Falls and Rhia’s boyfriend lives there, so we have lots of excuses to go lately.  I always try to combine educational benefits and fun for the kids in our travels even to nearby cities, so we tend to go as a family and make an adventure of the day.

There is a lot of other stuff going on (mostly good, some less so) and I hope to start catching up on all of it.

What are you and your kiddos up to this month?

A Week’s Worth of Fun Math Projects!

a week's worth of fun mathOne of my resolutions this year was to do some sort of fun math activity with the kids each day. I don’t care if it takes just a few minutes or what level it’s at, just as long as math play becomes a regular and enjoyable part of each day.

So far, we’ve been doing well. We’ve been playing with Cuisenaire rods, darts, dice, cards, silly word problems, made flower factors and so on.

Here are my plans for this week, in whatever order they work out. Since we have such snow and cold in Minnesota right now, I figured I would work that into some of the fun.

  1. Get a box of sugar cubes and divide them among the kids. Give them small things to measure in sugar cube units and show them how to figure out the items’ area by lining up sugar cubes along the length and width and multiplying the numbers, then have them fill in the area with sugar cubes and see if they get the same answer. Then have tea with sugar cubes.
  2. Tint some water with food coloring and fill various containers with it. Have the kids guess which containers hold more, and then measure. Compare tall, skinny, wide and oddly shaped containers. Then let the kids play at mixing the colors in the containers.
  3. Have each child guess the temperature outside and go see who’s closest. Subtract that temperature from the temperature inside to see how much warmer it is inside. Also check the temperature on the back porch, in the basement and in the refrigerator and freezer, and see how close they are to inside and outside temperatures.
  4. Sing 100 bottles of beer on the wall, the math version. Instead of taking one down, take turns singing out how many are taken down each time, and then as a group sing the answer. For instance, “95 bottles of beer on the wall, 95 bottles of beer… take 9 down, pass them around… 86 bottles of beer on the wall.” Feel free to switch out the traditional beer of the song for juice, milk, water or whatever your family chooses, of course!
  5. Give each child 25 chocolate chips. Ask them to figure out how many times 7 goes into 25 with the chips, with lines of 7 to show the answer. Eat the remainders. Then do it with 4’s, then 6’s, then 5’s and so on.
  6. Fill a measuring cup with one cup of snow, then bring it inside and let it melt. Make guesses on how much water it will melt into.  See who gets closest and subtract the difference, and talk about why snow takes up more volume than water.
  7. Play War, but make black cards positive and red cards negative.

If you have fun math ideas to share, please add them in the comments!

50 Ways to Use a Pumpkin for Homeschooling

50 educational ways to use pumpkinsI should be doing a million things and need to drive part of the family to Mankato soon, but I miss this space and you all (or you one person perhaps at this point!) so I thought I would bop in here for a quick post.

Yes, only I would decide to post 50 ways to use a pumpkin for homeschooling off the top of my head for a quick post!  LOL  Some people play video games to get their minds off things and have fun.  I write.  🙂

So here goes….  All kinds of crazy ways to learn with that pumpkin before it goes in the compost pile or pie.

  1. Measure the circumference
  2. Guess its weight
  3. Roast the seeds and experiment with different seasonings
  4. Do a rubbing of its skin
  5. Find a recipe for stuffed pumpkins and bake dinner in it
  6. Draw it
  7. See if it floats in water
  8. Use a mallet and golf tees to poke a pattern of holes (immensely satisfying if not terrible educational)
  9. Write a haiku about it
  10. Print out these pumpkin life cycle printables
  11. Roast it and bake with it
  12. Leave it outside and see how it changes over time
  13. Finger paint on it, clean and repeat
  14. Plant some of its seeds
  15. Figure out its capacity (how much it holds)
  16. Think of an alternate way to figure out its capacity
  17. Compare its weight to other foods
  18. Bake two different pie recipes for pumpkin pie and see which one is better
  19. Write out pumpkin on a paper and see how many other words you can make with the letters (pump, kin, pin…)
  20. Write a short story about a pumpkin
  21. Use the seeds for math manipulatives
  22. Use the seeds for a collage
  23. Look up how to say pumpkin in another language
  24. Read books or stories about pumpkins
  25. Write letters on clean pumpkin seeds and use them to spell words
  26. Look up the history of jack-o-lanterns
  27. Look up the nutritional information for pumpkins
  28. Watch videos of pumpkin trebuchet launchers
  29. Or instead of launching pumpkins, use mini pumpkins to make small pumpkin catapults
  30. Build your own (or a small scale one for smaller objects)
  31. Make a list of as many words as possible to describe a pumpkin
  32. Estimate how many seeds a pumpkin will have and then see how close everybody got
  33. Read these pumpkin riddles and try to make up your own
  34. Write a song about pumpkins
  35. Make construction paper jack-o-lanterns with all kinds of faces
  36. Write the word pumpkin in your fanciest handwriting
  37. Think of 10 ways to use pumpkins besides for carving or baking
  38. Give a short report on the history of pumpkins and/or jack-o-lanterns
  39. Predict and observe what the inside of a jack-o-lantern looks like before and after having a candle in it for several hours
  40. Take artistic photographs of pumpkins
  41. Write or tell a funny short story about what it was really like for Cinderella to ride a pumpkin coach to the ball
  42. Put pumpkin seeds outside near a window and watch to see what kind of wildlife eats them
  43. Use pushpins and rubber bands to make a geoboard on a pumpkin
  44. Challenge the kids to think up other things you could make jack-o-lanterns out of besides pumpkins
  45. Ask the kids to describe a pumpkin using all 5 senses
  46. Invent a pumpkin spice drink or dessert together
  47. Use a small pumpkin as a ball for playing catch outside
  48. Use a small pumpkin as a planter and plant seeds in it
  49. Write a pumpkin acrostic poem (write the letters PUMPKIN down the side of the page and each line starts with the corresponding letter)
  50. After Halloween, cut your jack-o-lantern into one-inch pieces and put pieces in all different environments and record how they change (freezer, fridge, outside, in a plastic bag, uncovered at room temperature, in vinegar…)

Got more?  Leave them in the comments!  Happy Halloween!

Homeschooling with Kindle Unlimited

If you’re a subscriber to Kindle Unlimited, you can read my books, Elderberries: The Beginner’s Guide to Foraging, Preserving and Using Elderberries for Health Remedies, Recipes, Drinks and More (with over 60 recipes for health remedies, desserts, jellies, wines, liqueurs and more), and A Magical Homeschool: Nature Studies (52 Wonderful Ways to Use Nature Studies in Every Season to Teach Science, Math, Art and More) for free!

Homeschooling with Kindle Unlimited

I’m enrolled in KDP on Amazon, which means these books are only available through Amazon and if you subscribe to Kindle Unlimited you can read them (and over a million other titles) for free.

We’ve been subscribed to KU for a few months and I’ve found a lot of great books for myself and the kids.  I started a Facebook group, Homeschooling with Kindle Unlimited to share good homeschooling books available through KU if you’re looking for new titles, too.

Homeschooling with Kindle Unlimited

I have found and shared lots of great books on the Facebook page so far, from Harry Potter to classic literature to math and science joke books to secular Charlotte Mason homeschool books to books about Vikings and parts of speech and woodworking projects…

Authors subscribed to the KDP program get paid a tiny payment per page read when their books are read through Kindle Unlimited, so if you are enrolled in KU this is a great free way to support your favorite authors too.  🙂

You can find out more about Kindle Unlimited here, and also sign up for a free 30 day trial (which is what we initially did to see if it was a good fit and then we decided to keep it).

Please leave comments about good books you know of in the program or subjects you’re interested in!

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